Training on Demand: Building Digital News Capacity (part 2)

Jan 13, 2014

Greetings. At the end of the year we brought you the first set of webinars in our three-part series on building digital news capacity. The series are based on our 11-week Knight training for stations.

The first three sessions laid the foundation for building digital capacity in your newsroom and for crafting stories that will resonate with and engage your audience. These next three build on that foundation by exploring workflow, photography and aggregation. Here's part three.

We’ve repackaged each webinar from the 11-week training by time stamping key takeaways as a way to make them easier to navigate and digest. While they build upon each other, and are intended to be consumed sequentially, you can pick and choose which topics you wish to explore and progress at your own pace.If you have any questions or comments or would like feedback on any of the optional “homework” assignments—please reach out at ds-editorial@npr.org.

Hilary Stohs-Krause's desk

WORKFLOW

Air Date: June 21, 2013
Guest Speakers:

Time Commitment:  60 mins (on average)
Watch the webinars: here

You should watch this webinar if: you want to hear how a reporter/editor, a reporter, a producer, a digital manager and a news director negotiate the new challenges to the traditional radio workflow that the demands of the digital audience have introduced.

Summary: Some of the most helpful learning comes when stations exchange ideas and practices. This is the thinking behind our workflow series. We talked with five leaders from member stations to get their input on how they meet the demands of radio and digital. We didn’t pick the biggest stations. In fact, you could describe these stations as small to medium-sized, but they've all embraced digital platforms with success. Each of these individuals has a unique perspective, but you'll find there are common threads such as clear communication and a focus on engaging content regardless of platform. These are some of our most popular webinars and they can give you actionable ideas for your news operation.

Credit Gabriella Demczuk/NPR

The Elements of Photography and Visual Storytelling

Air Date: June 28, 2013
Multimedia Trainer: Kainaz Amaria
Time Commitment: 1:07:36 mins
Watch the webinar: here

You should watch this webinar if: you want to understand the fundamentals of visual storytelling and what makes a good image. 

Summary: In this webinar, Kainaz Amaria explains the foundations of visual storytelling, including what makes a good image and why, how to get that good image in the field, and how to approach visual decisions for your story. She describes the five variations in visual storytelling, six ways to make a good gallery great, and the three most important aspects of an image. These are just a few of the themes Amaria highlights in this photojournalism guide. We highly recommend this webinar for your team. 

Credit Jim Hill/KUNC

Aggregation

Air Date: July 3, 2013
Digital News Specialist: Will Snyder & Teresa Gorman
Time Commitment: 1:02:07 mins
Watch the webinar: here

You should watch this webinar if: you want to learn best practices for how to use your newsroom resources wisely for aggregated posts.  

Summary: Aggregation is a great tool for getting information published quickly and it allows resource-stretched newsrooms to quickly and effectively cover more stories. But there are a few best practices you need to follow so that your audience understands where the information came from and why you're including it. Trainers Teresa Gorman and Will Snyder talk about when and how to properly use aggregation, and they present a lot of great tips on finding and embedding photos, videos and tweets.

What's next?
Stay tuned for the next (and last) three-part series, which will include webinars on How to Make the Most of Your Station's Facebook Page, Mining Social Media for Story Ideas and What Type of Local Content do People Share?

These sessions were created in the Spring and Summer of 2013. Any changes to best practices will be noted in the text.