Digital Strategy

Courtesy Brian Bull

In this webinar, we reviewed different strategies for finding and acquiring images for your site and social media.

Included in the webinar are questions to ask yourself before choosing a photo, six strategies to build your photo library, and three common myths about photo online use. Have a question about the resources here? Email Teresa at TGorman@NPR.org.

Questions to ask before choosing and publishing a photo:

Election night is less than a week away!  Here’s a quick rundown of resources from NPR Digital Services to help you prepare for the big night online.  

 

We're excited to announce the launch of a new Digital Services offering: Station Analytics. Its purpose is to provide stations the best business intelligence on your site and your streams, so you can measure your digital performance, benchmark your progress against other stations, and discover insights that support your decision making for all things digital.

 

The Station Analytics system provides:

When Digital Services embarked on our quest to create a mobile web experience for stations, we had a simple theory: If we optimize the user experience for small screens by focusing on what our mobile audience needs most, we should see mobile engagement increase. (Read about why we focused on mobile web.)

With a few dozen stations now using our new mobile web product, the initial results are in: Engagement with stories is up and the amount of listening is skyrocketing.

Streaming via the mobile site has more than tripled. That's the biggest headline when we look at data from 20 of the stations that have been using the new mobile web experience.

Mallory Benedict/PBS NewsHour/Flickr

If you’re still pulling together your election coverage or are looking for more ideas, we shared a procrastinator’s guide to a digital election coverage plan in a webinar Sept 27.  

Within the guide are  10 steps to think about, along with lots of examples of how public media have used those steps in their own local coverage. Here are those examples, along with several others that participants shared:

Jennifer Strachan from KPLU shares her stations' experience with making the often painful and necessary changes to see success emerge with digital innovation. A couple of key things I took from this article: 1. Follow data and best practices; not your gut. 2. Your station's digital experience may not look exactly like your on air experience; that's okay. 3. Fancy tools won't help you succeed; your station's commitment to execute will. 4. Be open and quick to change course when you know something isn't working.

Summer is great for vacations and relaxation, but in an election year, news stations are ramping coverage of campaigns, the conventions, and eventually, election night in November.

A host of News Directors, reporters and others are in Houston this week for PRNDI's 2012 conference.

This is public radio's one gathering solely for news practitioners, and there's a lot of great stuff on the agenda, ranging from a talk by NPR CEO Gary Knell to sessions on multi-platform journalism, ethics in public media, social media strategy and techniques, and a visit from members of NPR's Planet Money team.

Mont Saint Michel
LoboStudio Hamburg

Remember scarcity? I mean, surplus is great, but it was so much easier back in 1992. Radio stations had lots of media competitors but there was only one platform to worry about: radio.

The internet and technological change has blown up all that. Radio stations are still on radio, but they can also be on Facebook, twitter, Google+ (heard of it?), on a website or a blog. That’s great but so can everyone else.

Your Peanut Butter is in My Chocolate

The Wall Street Journal’s report that Apple’s upcoming iOS 6 software release will include a standalone podcast app for all iPhone users is another shot across the bow when it comes to live radio listening, but it’s potentially a boon to public radio stations that produce great podcasts. Update on June 26, 2012: the app is now available in the Apps Store.

This preview of the report released today by Edison Research caught my attention:

This year, we are reporting that the weekly usage of Internet radio (which includes both the online streams of terrestrial broadcasters and streams from pure-play streamers such as Pandora) has increased from 22% of Americans 12+ in 2011 to 29% in 2012 – a jump of over 30%. This is a number that we are accustomed to seeing grow bit by bit each year, but this is the largest year-over-year increase we’ve seen since we began tracking this stat in 1998. http://ow.ly/ac5z0

Why Mobile Web Matters

Apr 5, 2012
Flickr: Leeks

For many public media stations, mobile means one thing: apps. We all know mobile is important, and many stations have launched successful mobile apps that engage your audience with audio, news, and more.

But here’s the truth: If your app is the only component of your mobile strategy, you’re missing the boat. Mobile-optimized web pages are rapidly becoming the most important way to grow your online audience.

That’s why at NPR Digital Services we are currently working on a prototype of a mobile-optimized site for stations, which we showed off at the iMA conference last month.

Madalyn Painter from St. Louis Public Radio recently shared some impressive numbers around their digital audience growth over the past year for their website and audio streams.

Comparing this January to last, our number of unique visitors to the site has increased by 90 percent. Additionally, the number of people listening to our online streams has more than doubled.

NPR’s Facebook page and its 2.3 million-like audience is made up of users from thousands of cities across the world. We wondered: what if we focused on just one city?

The question arose after identifying a somewhat obscure Facebook feature that allows anyone with a Facebook page to customize posts by location. This means, for example, that you can post a story about Boston and modify it so that only users in Boston will see it in their Facebook feed.

Last October NPR Digital Services and Digital Media used this tool to launch an experiment with member station KPLU, in which we shared selected KPLU.org content on NPR's Facebook page, but only for the eyes of the Seattle region (KPLU's market). Four months into this experiment, we’ve made some unexpected discoveries around Facebook communities and the power of localization on a national platform.

7 Steps to Relevance in Digital Journalism

Jan 26, 2012

Nathan Bernier is a radio reporter and lead blogger for KUTNews.org, the station’s news blog, which is operated by the news staff. This interview was conducted and condensed by Ki-Min Sung. 

1. Use analytics.

Analytics will not ruin your news. You will not write about Justin Beiber or iPad 2 stories because you’re not stupid. I was concerned that introducing analytics would create a race to the bottom, but I think it better informs your editorial decisions. Ultimately, you ignore analytics at your peril.

That said, I don’t think more page views necessarily means a better site. The quality of the interaction matters a lot. Page views are just one measure of success.But you do have a responsibility to your audience to know if they like your stuff.

Argo Project Milestone: Launch of Open Source Site

Jan 18, 2012

We are pleased to announce that we’re making a new resource available to public radio stations to support your efforts to drive digital audience: the Project Argo open source site at http://argoproject.org.

On the site, you’ll find:

--The Argo blog platform being used by the pilot stations available as a free download.

--Tools and best practices for building local news beats online.

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