Shows

The Daily Circuit social media host Stephanie Curtis

Should a show host run their own Twitter account? During our Twitter chat about digital strategies for shows, that question came up several times. There's not a yes or no answer, but one show that has benefited from active social media accounts is The Daily Circuit, a daily three-hour long show on Minnesota Public Radio.

The Daily Circuit has a digitally savvy staff, including a social media host and two hosts that are active on Twitter. I turned to host Kerri Miller for her tips and thoughts on using social media as a talk show host.

Miller, in addition to one to three hours a day on air,  tweets several times a day asking questions related to the show, about the latest books she’s reading, and more to over 11,600 followers. 

During our chat, she said that although it took her time to fit social media into her schedule and to figure out what to tweet, it is now an integral part of her job at The Daily Circuit.

Here are five tips she shared from her experience:

Davar Ardalan

Throughout the month of March, women from technology fields in Silicon Valley to South Africa live tweeted a day in their lives using the hashtag #NPRWIT.

Maureen McMurray/NHPR

Recently, we teamed up with Jody Avirgan of WNYC's The Brian Lehrer Show, and Maureen McMurray and Taylor Quimbly of NHPR's Word of Mouth, to hold a Twitter chat for producers to share and discuss digital strategies for public radio shows. 

Here are some highlights from our conversation: 

Emily Alfin Johnson/NPR

Here at Digital Services, we're checking in with shows around the country about their digital best practices and strategies. Have a suggestion for a post or show to talk to? Email it to EJohnson1@npr.org or tweet it to us @NPRDS.

The team behind WNYC’s two hour midday program, The Brian Lehrer Show, has made Twitter a huge part of the digital life of the show. I spoke with host, Brian Lehrer and Associate Producer Jody Avirgan about how they find the time, and some of the lessons they’ve learned along the way.  

Jason Howie/Flickr

You’ve set up a Twitter account for your show, and started tweeting. You have a Facebook page and you’re posting to it regularly. You've read about how to get your show started off on the right foot with social. Now, you might be asking what the next step is to help make your social media efforts resonate with your audience.

Jody Avirgan

One of the issues we hear show producers struggling with again and again, is how to find the time to do digital content justices in the midst of a tight production schedule, especially if there is not a dedicated web producer. 

To find some possible solutions we turned to Jody Avirgan, a producer for WNYC's midday talk show, The Brian Lehrer Show. Jody is responsible for the majority of the show's digital presence, but also is a full time producer for the show, and has experimented with how to make the web succeed with the limited amount of time he can give to it. 

Jody recently joined us for a webinar to share how he tackles the challenge of creating great content and balancing his on air and online responsibilities. You can find the full recording as well the slide show from the presentation below. 

Flickr/CC-BY/JohanL

On Wednesday, March 26th at 2:30pm EST, we held  a Twitter chat to discuss digital strategy for public radio shows. Guests from NHPR's Word of Mouth and WNYC's The Brian Lehrer Show joined, along with many other producers from local show. For a recap, go to: Three Things We Learned From Our #ShowsChat

John Rosman/OPB

Here at Digital Services, we're checking in with shows around the country about their digital best practices and strategies. 

One show that’s doing an admirable job of engaging it’s audience on Twitter and on their website is Oregon Public Radio’s midday show, Think Out Loud. I spoke with Dave Blanchard, one of the show’s producers, and John Rosman, a digital producer at OPB who works with the show, about how TOL tackles their digital responsibility.

Maria Elena/Flickr

Growing your show’s social media presence can feel challenging at times, especially when you’re just starting out. But many of the basics that help reporters and stations find their foothold can help shows too. 

Maureen McMurray/NHPR

NHPR's Word of Mouth focuses on “new ideas, emerging trends and untold stories.” The hour-long show airs Monday through Thursdays and Saturdays. Their engaging and fun online presence is consistent, and often experimental. (Terrible love song anyone?)

Jody Avirgan

Here at Digital Services, we're starting an ongoing project checking in with shows around the country about their digital best practices and strategies. From some of these conversations, we'll share many of the tips various public radio show staff have for succeeding online. We'll also point to relevant resources and training from our own archive. Have a suggestion for a person or show to talk to? Email it to ejohnson1@npr.org, or send us a tweet @NPRDS. 

Jody Avirgan

Here at Digital Services, we're checking in with shows around the country about their digital best practices and strategies. 

Making the Most of Your Audio in the Mobile Age [VIDEO]

Dec 10, 2013
Jolie Myers

American Public Media’s Marketplace has successfully increased its digital audience for audio by following a simple but effective strategy: it has tailored content to meet the needs of its digital audience, and it has pushed that content to as many relevant platforms as possible.

WNYC

We've been hosting a series of conversations about audio innovation over the past few weeks, including webinars with Andy Bowers of Slate and Roman Mars, creator of 99% Invisible. Earlier this week, I spoke with Dean Cappello, the Chief Content Officer of WNYC/New York Public Radio. I wanted his perspective as someone who has years of experience producing audio, as well as overseeing the work of others, including successful shows like Here's the Thing, Radiolab, Studio 360, and On the Media.

If you missed the webinar, you can watch it here. But if you don't have an hour, here are my takeaways from the conversation with Cappello; the paraphrasing is my own.

Slate

In the early days, Slate’s podcasts amounted to Andy Bowers reading web articles into a mic. Podcasting has come a long way and has seen its share of experiments. Slate's podcasts, in particular, now have a unique sound that fans love. Their popular podcasts include Political GabfestCulture GabfestHang Up and ListenThe Audio Book Club, and many others. 

I reached out to Andy to talk about innovation in digital audio because the sound of Slate's success is so different from what I hear from traditional public broadcasters. Much of the public radio podcasting space consists of repurposed broadcasts. But if you take a listen to some of the other successful podcasters, you too will hear a difference in sound. There is room on the internet for all varieties. 

Andy Bowers outlined the extraordinary development of Slate's Podcasts in our innovations in digital audio webinar

Raymond Ahner

 99% Invisible, the radio program about design and architecture, has not only developed a growing listener base for the audio, but has a considerable following online for the program's visual experience.

We interviewed 99% Invisible host and producer Roman Mars about the challenge of visualizing sound in a webinar on February 14.

On Point, Facebook

This is NPR has a post about the secret sauce that makes a great call-in radio show, based on best practices at NPR’s Talk of the Nation, WBUR’s On Point, and NHPR’s The Exchange. Among the ingredients:

Fresh Air Associate Producer Melody Kramer presented to member stations as part of NPR Digital Services Knight Foundation training

Below are the following: Melody's slides, a video recording of the presentation and a Storify of the live tweets.

The Social Life of an On Point Show [VIDEO]

May 17, 2012

We take you through the social media process of WBUR’s On Point.

Please note: some of this information and directions may be outdated. Much of it has been updated in our new series on digital strategy for public radio shows. If you have any questions, please email DS-Editorial@npr.org. You can find the latest, here