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Jody Avirgan

One of the issues we hear show producers struggling with again and again, is how to find the time to do digital content justices in the midst of a tight production schedule, especially if there is not a dedicated web producer. 

To find some possible solutions we turned to Jody Avirgan, a producer for WNYC's midday talk show, The Brian Lehrer Show. Jody is responsible for the majority of the show's digital presence, but also is a full time producer for the show, and has experimented with how to make the web succeed with the limited amount of time he can give to it. 

Jody recently joined us for a webinar to share how he tackles the challenge of creating great content and balancing his on air and online responsibilities. You can find the full recording as well the slide show from the presentation below. 

NPR's Code Switch, a team that reports on race, ethnicity and culture, launched in April, 2013. Months later, their Twitter account has over 16,000 followers and they've had a variety of fascinating conversations on different social media sites with their audience. 

NPR Digital Journalist Kat Chow recently shared how they did it in a webinar with Digital Services. Watch the recording and read through a summary below.

Making the Most of Your Audio in the Mobile Age [VIDEO]

Dec 10, 2013
Jolie Myers

American Public Media’s Marketplace has successfully increased its digital audience for audio by following a simple but effective strategy: it has tailored content to meet the needs of its digital audience, and it has pushed that content to as many relevant platforms as possible.

St. Louis Public Radio reporter Chris McDaniel started highlighting lobbyist gifts to lawmakers in a regular series last spring to make the data more approachable. When they wanted to take it to the next level, they turned to NPR's news apps team for advice. St.

Serious Stories Can Be Shareable, Too

Nov 13, 2013
Russ Gossett

We’ve heard this a lot lately: Fun stories, not serious stories, work on social media.

But we’ve found otherwise. You can shape serious stories to make them shareable and more informative for the public. We’re not talking about watering down serious journalism — we’re talking about crafting stories for the digital audience.

This happens every day in the Local Stories Project, which curates the most shareable member station content and distributes it through the NPR Facebook page. We’ve seen that people have an appetite for interacting with important stories that affect their lives. We found similar results in our research into the types of local stories that foster engagement.

Still, we wanted to be sure. Can serious stories actually get as much attention as fun ones on social media? And how can reporters and editors shape serious stories so that the audience will like, share, comment, retweet, etc.?

To help answer these questions, we reviewed 809 stories from the Local Stories Project that we then classified as either fun or serious. These were station stories that were posted to the NPR Facebook page and geotargeted — only people in each station’s local region could see them.

The surprising results offer insight into how serious stories can be shareable.

 

Reddit has become an essential tool for journalists. The social news and information site is helpful for discovering stories, finding sources and generating community discussions. WAMU's Chris Chester and KBIA's Scott Pham are active users of Reddit and shared some tips in this webinar.

9 Types of Local Stories that Cause Engagement

Aug 8, 2013
Russ Gossett

When you come across a story about your town, city or state, what makes you want to share it?

Jim Hill/KUNC

Whether it's breaking news or a slideshow of audience-submitted photos, aggregation is a great tool for getting information published quickly. But there are few best practices you need to follow so that your audience understands where the information came from and why you're including it. So, let's start with the anatomy of an aggregated story and then we'll jump to reasons to aggregate.

via MDGovpics (CC-BY)

  

Welcome to the social media part of our training! This page has everything you need to guide you through the next three weeks, so bookmark it, and email Teresa if you have any questions at tgorman@npr.org. 

The next three weeks will focus on the practical ways you can use social media for reporting, audience growth, story mining and content creation. 

The first week of social media training focuses on making the most of your station's Facebook page. We also begin our Twitter contest, which you can learn more about here.

Mining Social Media for Story Ideas [VIDEO]

Jul 1, 2013
MDGovpics (CC-BY)

 

Want to put social media and your community to work for you to find story ideas? Eric Athas and Teresa Gorman walk you through how to to utilize your social media community on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Reddit to find sources and story ideas for on-air and online.   

Video:

Gabriella Demczuk / NPR

In this webinar, multimedia trainer Kainaz Amaria, takes you on a photographic journey from understanding the fundamentals of visual storytelling to what makes a good image and how you can make better portraits.

VIDEO

Elements of Photography from NPR Digital Services on Vimeo.

Pull that popcorn out of the microwave, kick back in a recliner (or desk chair) and get ready to have your workflow revolutionized. We talked with five leaders from member stations--a digital manager, a senior producer, a reporter and a news director--to get their input on how to work together and individually to meet the demands of both the radio and digital. These aren't big operations; you could accurately describe them as small to medium-sized, and they've all embraced digital platforms successfully.

Best Practices for Web Writing [VIDEO]

Jun 13, 2013
KatieKrueger / Flickr

This session examines techniques for webifying your radio story for the online audience. We also explore what makes a great web-native story. And we offer advice on when to choose one approach over the other.

We will also take a look at how to manage your time when producing content for several mediums. Some questions to ask: 

1. Who is my audience?
2. What is most relevant?
3. What is the best use of my time? 

If you're looking for some inspiration, take a look at the work of some of these excellent journalists in broadcast:

What makes a good headline?

This webinar covers how you should think about headlines, how you should approach them and some ways you can go about writing them.  

Some good headline writers to watch include: Gawker, Quartz, The Atlantic WireForbes and The Two-Way

5 Lessons from WABE's Most Successful Pledge Drive (Ever)

May 21, 2013

WABE’s latest pledge drive resulted in 15,393 pledges and $2 million. The results weren’t a coincidence – WABE’s staff tried some new things and had a smart plan to get their listeners and readers pledging away. After noting their huge success, we asked Jason Parker, WABE digital media strategist, how it all happened. Here are five (ok six) lessons Jason shared.*

http://instagram.com/kpcc

Post updated May 16 with resources from the webinar:

"Social photography is nothing less than a creative revolution."

That's taken from a blog post by KPCC visual journalist Grant Slater on the new blog AudioVision. Slater is part of a team of journalists exploring what public radio looks like in Southern California.

courtesy FOAM museum, exhibit by Erik Kessels

Aggregation is just another word for using your resources wisely. The technique can be used on all types of stories ranging from weather to politics to breaking news.

In this webinar, we cover the basic requirements for aggregation on the web, how to find visuals to accompany aggregated posts, and how to make YouTube's search functions work for you when looking for videos for your site.

VIDEO

In the latest NPR Digital Services webinar, we heard from Blair Hickman, the Community Editor at ProPublica.

Blair walked us through the life of ProPublica's  investigation into U.S. patient safety and the important role communities played in the process. 

Here are the five steps ProPublica takes for community-powered investigative reporting.

courtesy KQED Pop

Is there a place for pop culture in public media arts and culture coverage? Can public media reach new and younger audiences?

Mash those two questions together, and you'll get KQED Pop. KQED Pop is exploring topics that we don't normally see on the traditional arts and culture beat - from race and the Kardashians to the psychology of unfriending someone on Facebook

Sam Sanders/NPR

In this webinar, multimedia trainer Kainaz Amaria, takes you on a photographic journey from understanding the fundamentals visual storytelling to what makes a good image and how you can make (not take) better portraits.

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